1 for 2

 

 

These are two collage-y versions of t-shirts that I’ve made before: on the left, the Alison Glass pattern; on the right, the Deer & Doe Plantain.

L: Alison Glass Shirt

What’s going on with the shoulder there? Whatever it is, I can just add it to the list of this project’s “quirks.” While the dress I made from this pattern used a drapey knit, this one was snappy and rolled like crazy at the cut edge. It’s a yard of the Tokyo knit from Marcy Tilton; sleeves are 1/4 yard of a mesh knit. I’ve made this t-shirt three times, and EVERY TIME I over-trim the hem. I try it on, mark it, add 1.5″, and it STILL seems short to  me. This is the longest and most wearable version yet; my daughter pairs the others with her high-waisted 80s jeans. Might be destined for the donation pile.  And by “might” I mean “is.”

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umm yeah, no.

 

R: Deer & Doe Plantain

Very happy with this one. Body was a 1-yard end cut from Marcy Tilton; sleeves are a gray mesh knit from my small stash. I cut the hems along the selvedge end and felt very fancy.

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The pants are flat-front chinos from Lands End. Flat-front pants are a rare find in the RTW world and confirmation that I really need to bite the bullet and try Colette’s Clover pattern.

Shoes are  refurbished Donald J. Pliners from the thrift store: $5 + 20 minutes with the suede brush and eraser. I thought they looked vintage-y.

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some people restore cars. or paintings. i restore shoes.
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Plantain Tee

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This might be my new favorite tee shirt pattern. I love the fitted shoulders, the subtle-yet-forgiving shaping, and the deep scoop neck (which shows where my daughter’s rabbit bit me; long story).

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I’m not sure whether it was the fabric or the pattern, but the neckband achieved the perfect medium between saggy and tourniquet.  The print is lovely; even if it is a little Alfred Dunner from a distance, it’s more Boden up close (no shade, Alfred Dunner).

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Up next: Flamingos and #OAL2017….

 

Testing

muslin

 

Lately I’ve been making muslins, with mixed results.

 

 Jalie Vanessa 

I had high hopes for this one and was convinced that I could somehow replicate my beloved Eileen Fisher pants, which I wear at least twice per week year round. Not sure why I thought that a pattern with an elastic waistband, drawstring, and pockets would produce a super-clean silhouette. I blame it on Easter candy.  I won’t be sewing this one.

 

 

 

Deer & Doe Plantain

I love a good scoop neck so I was willing to go through the rigamarole of printing, piecing, and tracing a pattern. Totally worth it! I’ll definitely make at least one of these.

Plantain
Plantain Tee. Photo: Deer and Doe

 

Alabama Chanin A-Line Top

Another winner. I sewed one of these by hand last summer. The knit I used was a little too stiff (even after washing) and I was overzealous in shortening the hem. I still had the pattern, so I gave it another go on the machine.  I think this will be beautiful in a drapey knit (which I’ve already ordered from Emma One Sock).

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A-Line Top. Photo: Alabama Chanin

 

Vogue 1496

I really wanted this to work, to the point of entertaining visions of myself wearing it as I sipped craft cocktails, smug in my cerebral, covertly feminine aesthetic. Sooooo, that’s not going to happen, which is for the best on a lot of levels. Even in the smallest size, no amount of drape will prevent this from smothering my frame without major pattern grading….and even that’s pretty iffy. Alas.

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Vogue 1496

 

Coincidentally,  two weeks ago I also picked up a copy of Sandra Betzina’s  Power Sewing for $1 at a rummage sale. It’s full of dated clothes and timeless nuggets of sewing wisdom, including this:

“Never feel guilty about tossing a pattern. Only 50% or so are worth making. A pattern that doesn’t progress past a pretest doesn’t count as a failure.” 

Thanks, Sandra! And no hard feelings about your V1496. It really is stunning, just not on me.