Morris Blazer

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I’ve had very good luck finding jackets from local consignment and thrift stores:

I love how they elevate an outfit and have long been determined to make a blazer myself.

The blogosphere is full of stunning examples of Grainline Studio’s Morris Blazer, and Jen generously offers a very clear sewalong that covers everything from fabric and interfacing choices to final pressing. I chose this stretch cotton sateen from Britex; the eggplant color is a flattering alternative to black, per Victoire de Castellane. (Worth clicking to read her beauty philosophy and to learn the word faux-sombre.)

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I’ve never sewn a jacket before and found this pattern to be demanding but accessible. The toughest parts for me were setting in the sleeves, managing bulky bottom corners during edgestitching, and facing down my own perfectionism in the mirror:

  • Sleeves. I pin-basted the sleeves using Ann’s tutorial. I’ve since come across two additional tutorials from Craftsy and Blueprints for Sewing, both of which show examples of easing in sleeves while flat. The obedient Home Ec student in me gasped–is that allowed? I’ll have to try it on a muslin sometime.
  • Bulk. The fabric I used is described as “medium” weight on the site, but it feels heavy to me. Maybe that’s because I’m used to wearing and sewing with knits. I wound up ripping out stitches and redoing them using this method (scroll down for the helpful hint about using a fabric scrap to level the presser foot).
  • Perfectionism. Intellectually, I know that people are not spending their energy scrutinizing the craftswoman-ship of my blazer. Yet with every project, I struggle to focus on healthy goals for self-improvement vs. perfectionism. Progress is slow, but steady.
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Tank: Style Arc Evie. Pants: Old Navy.            Oxfords: Clarks.

Have you ever set flat sleeves into a woven garment?

How do you deal with perfectionism?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Morris Blazer

  1. Nice work! I almost always set sleeves in the flat, for both knit and woven fabrics. It is so much easier to handle the fabric, and I always get fantastic results.

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